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Recent Articles

Catch the latest news from ACRC's scientists, staff, students, and partners.

Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center names new director Tom Thornton

ACRC is pleased to announce the appointment of Tom Thornton as ACRC Director as of April 11, 2021. He will also serve as Professor of Environment and Society on UAS faculty. Thornton has served as Dean and Vice Provost since July 2018 and as Interim Co-Director of the Rainforest Center since August 2020, alongside Research Assistant Professor of Environmental Science Jason Fellman. 

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coastal landscape

Carbon in the Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest: New Research

Beneath the canopy of North America’s largest remaining old-growth forest, globally-significant amounts of carbon are captured from the atmosphere by plant life cycled through the soil, rivers, and water bodies of coastal Southeast Alaska and British Columbia. The Pacific Coastal Temperate Rainforest (PCTR) is a key region for research into carbon stocks and movement between forested and glacierized areas and the highly productive coastal waters. 

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ACRC research presentations at the Fall 2020 American Geophysical Union meeting

Hear from ACRC researchers and affiliates at one of the world’s largest scientific conferences this week! The American Geophysical Union Fall 2020 meeting is being held virtually from December 1st-17th, featuring thousands of hours of sessions and keynotes from the Earth and space sciences community.

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How are Southeast Alaskans responding to COVID-19? Take this survey to help researchers understand the impacts

ACRC researchers at the University of Alaska Southeast are working with the Sitka Sound Science Center, the Central Council of the Tlingit-Haida Tribes, and RAND Corporation to gain a better understanding of how Southeast Alaskans perceive the risk of COVID-19 and consequently how Southeast Alaskans are prepared against and responding to COVID-19.

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ACRC convenes stakeholders for strategic visioning session

On September 29, over 30 stakeholders as well as current and former leadership, staff, and researchers met virtually to envision the future of the University of Alaska Southeast’s Alaska Coastal Rainforest Center. The session included an overview from former Director and now affiliate faculty member Allison Bidlack, followed by discussion groups to gather input on ACRC’s research priorities, organizational structure, and metrics for success. 

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New study highlights the role of overlooked ecological factors in salmon restoration success

In the Methow River of northern Washington state, imperiled populations of salmon and steelhead are at a mere fraction of their historic numbers. Restoration efforts can help bring back these populations, but how do managers prioritize which methods to employ, and where?

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chinook salmon

ACRC welcomes new leadership this fall

This fall, ACRC marks a new era as long-time director Allison Bidlack transitions into a new role at the NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service as Deputy Director of the Auke Bay Laboratory. Allison has led ACRC for over eight years, growing ACRC as a premier research institute in the north Pacific coastal temperate rainforest with a dynamic team of scientists, staff, and faculty. Though she will be missed, we look forward to continuing collaboration with her in her new role at NOAA.

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Watch: New AK CASC video on glacial lake outburst floods in Juneau

Check out the first video in a short series on glacial outburst flooding at Suicide Basin, in Juneau.

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ACRC welcomes new research faculty member, interdisciplinary scientist Jim Powell

As a center dedicated to interdisciplinary science in support of resilient communities and ecosystems, we are excited to announce the addition of UAS assistant professor of public administration Jim Powell to the ACRC team. Powell brings his decades of experience in natural resources and adaptive governance to our group, with a focus on how local governments are adapting to climate change.

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eagle beach scientists

How do landslides impact the carbon balance of Southeast Alaska?

The Tongass National Forest in Southeast Alaska is the greatest carbon reserve in North America, capturing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in plants and soil. But natural and human disturbances, like erosion and logging, affect carbon stocks by moving organic material out of the forest, into streams and eventually coastal waters.

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